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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s History is full of odd items and events that make us modern humans marvel at their sheer weirdness…and firearms history is no exception. You’ve probably heard of your fair share of weird, but well-known firearms, from pocket knife pistols to guns built into walking canes to rifles with curved barrels intended to allow the user to shoot around corners. Henry VIII’s Three Barreled Mace Pistol Today, however, we’re going to talk about some firearms you probably haven’t heard about.

Crazy Guns that Never Were

Crazy Guns that Never WereTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s History is full of odd items and events that make us modern humans marvel at their sheer weirdness…and firearms history is no exception. You’ve probably heard of your fair share of weird, but well-known firearms, from pocket knife pistols to guns built into walking canes to rifles with curved barrels intended to allow the user to shoot around corners. Henry VIII’s Three Barreled Mace Pistol Today, however, we’re going to talk about some firearms you probably haven’t heard about.  The following guns are not just weird.  Rather, they are so strange that they never even made it past the prototype stage.  In some cases, the gun’s lack of success was due to design flaws.  In other cases, the gun was just too unconventional for consumers at the time to get behind. Now that I’ve caught your interest, let’s take a look at these weird firearms. Superimposed Firearms Take a moment to appreciate the convenience of cartridge-based ammunition.  Before cartridges were invented, loading a firearm was a much longer process and shooters were limited to a single shot at a time.  Superimposed firearms were intended to solve that problem in the pre-cartridge era. Superimposed Pistol Superimposed firearms require the same steps for loading, but are intended to have multiple rounds loaded at the same time.  Each round was supposed to act as a seal to prevent the consecutive ones from firing each time ignition occurred.  They also used a series of touch holes to prevent the powder from mixing. Some firearms used a sliding lock that could be used for each charge, while others had multiple locks with one for each charge. Superimposed Rifle Various gunsmiths and inventors created designs for superimposed firearms from the 1600s through the 1800s, but only a few isolated pistols made it past prototyping.  The most notable of these inventors is the American Joseph Belton, who tried without success to license his Belton Flintlock to the Continental Congress, British Army, and East India Trading Company. Belton Flintlock Rapid Fire Musket The problem with this design is exactly what you might expect.  These guns were one mistake, misshapen round, or dirty barrel away from a small explosion.  Unsurprisingly, no one seemed to think these firearms were novel or convenient enough to risk losing a hand. Dardick Revolver The triangularly shaped round was initially invented post-World War II by United States military researchers looking for a more space effective round for use in machine guns.  While triangularly shaped rounds took up 50% less space in the magazine, they were never adopted by the military. Various Triangular Rounds Later, in the mid to late 1950s, David Dardick adopted this kind of ammunition, which he dubbed “trounds,” to fire from his Dardick Revolver, which was available in the Model 1100, Model 1500, and the Model 2000. The strange appearance of Dardick’s ammunition was enhanced by their color.  Dardick’s trounds were all encased in blue, green, or white polymer. Dardick Revolver with Eye-Catching Trounds The Dardick Revolver was magazine fed, an odd feature which was permitted due to the revolver’s open barrel design.  This allowed the Dardick Revolver to have an incredibly high capacity compared to other revolvers.  The Model 1100 had a 10 round capacity, the Model 1500 could be configured to hold either 11 or 15 rounds, and the Model 2000 had a 20 round capacity. Dardick’s Magazine Feed System Unlike contemporary firearms with removable magazines, the Dardick Revolver’s magazine was fixed and internal.  It was fed through a door on the side of the gun. The Model 1500, in particular, had another strange design feature.  Similar to the CZ-455, the Dardick Model 1500 featured an interchangeable barrel.  This allowed for the use of .38, .32, or .22 trounds, fired from either a 4 or 6-inch barrel. "Dardick Model 1500" Despite these innovative design features, or perhaps because of them, the Dardick Revolver never achieved public acceptance. Gyrojet Family of Firearms Like the Dardick Revolver, Gyrojet firearms, available in both pistol and rifle configurations, are most notable because of their odd ammunition. Gyrojet Mark I Model B Sporter Carbine Rather than typical bullets, Gyrojet firearms, created in the 1960s, fired 13mm rockets called microjets, which were able to actually increase speed as they got farther away from the point of fire, up to a certain distance. This led to firearms with very little recoil and with lighter weight barrels, as they didn’t need to stand up to as much force from combustion gases as a typical firearm. Various Microjet Rounds In theory, this sounds great, but in practice was a different story.  Tests found Gyrojet firearms to be inaccurate, unreliable, cumbersome, and slow to load. Even the most generous estimates suggested a failure rate of, at the very least, 1%.  Microjets typically stopped accelerating at around 60 feet. While these guns did see more success than others on this list in that some models were produced for commercial sale and military use, very few were sold and even fewer saw action.  The technology of the time was simply unable to rectify the issues of the design, and the design went out of style long before the necessary technology became available. Gyrojet MK II Model C Pistol However, this does mean that you can actually get your hands on a Gyrojet gun.  That is if you can find one and are willing to spend, at a minimum, $1000 for one of the more common models.  Of course, that price may not seem so bad until you consider that, if you want to actually be able to shoot it, you can expect to spend at least $100 per jet. Davy Crockett Nuclear Rifle You probably know that the US put a lot of time and resources into nuclear weapons development during the Cold War with varying levels of success.  One of these weapons was the Davy Crockett nuclear rifle. "Davy Crockett Nuclear" Rifle One of the smallest nuclear weapons systems ever created, the Davy Crockett nuclear rifle fired the M-388 nuclear projectile which had a yield equivalent to between 10 and 20 tons of TNT. In terms of nukes, that is really small. Basically as small as it gets in fact. To put it in perspective, the two bombs the USA used against the Empire of Japan in WWII had a nuclear yield between 15 and 20 kilotons (15,000 – 20,000 tons of TNT). However, considering the size – that’s a huge explosion from a 76 lb projectile fired from a gun shorter than the average man. The Davy Crockett was intended to be the first line of defense against Soviet tanks and heavy artillery.  However, there were a few problems. Test of the Davy Crockett System During Operation Sunbeam They were difficult to use and inaccurate, and there was no way to stop the M-388 projectile from exploding in the event of an accidental discharge.  These problems are unsettling enough, especially when you consider the extreme power of the projectile, but they seem manageable in comparison to a couple other issues with the Davy Crockett nuclear rifle. Diagram of the M-388 Nuclear Projectile One of these issues was the devices range.  The M28 version had a range of one and a quarter miles.  That’s well beyond the M-388’s immediately fatal range of a quarter mile, but still well within the fallout range of five or more miles.  Even the follow-up attempt, the M29, which doubled the M28’s range, still failed to exceed the fallout range. Three-Person Crew Loading a Davy Crockett Nuclear System Understandably, no one wanted to shoot a firearm that has pretty good odds of killing the user as well as the target.  Despite this, over 2,000 Davy Crockett nuclear rifles were manufactured and deployed between 1961 and 1971, which brings us to the second issue. Jeep Mounted Davy Crockett NATO, the military alliance the United States has belonged to since the end of World War II, refused to even entertain the idea of using the Davy Crockett nuclear system, and for good reason.  As you probably remember from your history classes, the only thing that kept the (sort of) peace between the USSR and United States during the Cold War was that each knew the other had nuclear weapons as well as that if one side used their own nukes, the other would respond in kind (i.e., Mutually Assured Destruction – M.A.D. ). Davy Crockett Nuclear Rifle on Display at the National Infantry Museum at Fort Benning NATO leadership also knew that and was concerned that using the Davy Crockett system would lead the Soviets to use their own nuclear weapons, leading to an all-out nuclear war and probably the destruction of hundreds of millions of people, including innocents, and more than a few countries. Probably a good call on the part of the NATO leadership. Some Final Thoughts Looking back at weird guns is a great reminder of the wildness of human creativity and innovation.  Though these guns never got to be widely used, their designers deserve kudos and respect for their out of the box thinking, even if it didn’t always lead to the highest quality firearm. Harmonica Pistol Granted, some ideas are clearly worse than others. Now, as always, I want you to hear your thoughts! What are your favorite weird guns? Are there any modern guns you think people in the future will look at with the same amusement that we look at these guns?   Do you have any unusual firearms in your own collection?  Let me know in the comments below.

[History] Walther PPK: From James Bond to Today

[History] Walther PPK: From James Bond to Today

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Like all movies adapted from books, the James Bond film franchise has some significant differences from Ian Fleming’s novels. One thing that hasn’t changed is the spy’s handgun of choice, the Walther PPK . Sean Connery as James Bond in From Russia with Love The Walther PPK was 007’s government issue sidearm and appears constantly throughout both the book series (well, after From Russia with Love , anyway) and the film series. In fact, the gun’s use by James Bond is considered to be a large part of why the gun is still popular today. But what exactly is the Walther PPK anyway and what makes it so special? Well, you’re about to find out, because in this post we’re going to look at the history of the Walther PPK and how it became the favorite gun of the world’s most famous fictional spy. Walther PPK 630 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 630 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Guns.Com (See Price) GunBroker.Com (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing For the optimal experience, feel free to start this playlist of James Bond themes in the background: Table of Contents Loading... Origins of the Walther PPK The Walther PPK had been in production for almost 30 years before 007 would first get his hands on it. The Walther PP (Polizeipistole) series was released in 1929 by German small arms manufacturer Carl Walther GmbH Sportwaffen, who designed the weapon for police use. The Walther PP Series was popular among European police and was used by German military and police under the Third Reich. The Walther PPK (Polizeipistole Kriminalmodel), released the following year, is the most popular variant in the Walther PP series. The PPK is a scaled-down version of the PP, made to be more concealable, ideal for undercover work. The Walther PPK The PPK was also designed to be easy to use. With a loaded magazine, just pull back the slide. A round will be chambered after the slide is released and the pistol will be prepared for single action fire. If you want to be able to safely carry the PPK but still have it ready for use, press down the decocker catch with your thumb, dropping the hammer and rotating the hammer block between the hammer and firing pin and making the pistol safe for carrying. Move the decocker catch back up to put the device into double action mode. When you’re ready to fire, you just have to pull the trigger. After a shot is fired, the pistol will return to single action mode, and the slide will remain open once the magazine is empty. Unlike most contemporary pistols which had a heel catch magazine release, the Walther PPK has a frame-mounted magazine release. You can see why it was popular among military, police, and intelligence, both real and fictional. Even outside of the gun’s depiction in the James Bond franchise, it has a history checkered with use by notable individuals. In 1945, Adolf Hitler used his PPK to commit suicide in the final moments of World War II. In 1979 the Walther PPK was used in the assassination of another dictator, South Korea’s Park Chung-hee, by Kim Jae-gyu. Elvis Presley also famously owned a Walther PPK with a silver finish and “Elvis” engraved on one side and “TCB” (“taking care of business”) on the other. Elvis Presley’s Walther PPK But, while interesting, none of that explains how James Bond ended up carrying a PPK, so let’s move on. How James Bond Got His PPK Ian Fleming was no gun expert, but he did serve in British Naval intelligence in World War II. He originally had James carry a .32 ACP Beretta 418, the same kind of handgun that Fleming carried during his own service. It wasn’t Fleming’s idea to make the change. Rather, in 1956, not long before To Russia with Love would be published, Fleming got a fan letter from Geoffrey Boothroyd, a former Major in the British Army and a respected firearm expert. Boothroyd wrote that while he enjoyed the James Bond novels, he felt that the Beretta 418 was underpowered for use by a spy. He suggested that James should instead use a hammerless revolver like the Smith & Wesson Centennial Airweight since it had more power and a hammer could potentially catch on the spy’s clothing. Ian Fleming on the Goldfinger Set with Sean Connery The letter started a dialogue between the writer and the firearms expert. Fleming wrote back, saying that he appreciated the letter and that he agreed with the suggestion that James should have a more powerful sidearm, but thought that he should have an automatic pistol rather than a revolver. Fleming also asked Boothroyd to suggest one, which Boothroyd happily did: the Walther PPK. To make the transition, Fleming modified the ending of To Russia with Love to include James’s Beretta getting caught in his holster, endangering James’s life. At the beginning of the next novel, Dr. No , James is given the Walther PPK by Q, who had been named after Boothroyd as thanks for the expert’s help. The scene from the novel is used almost verbatim in the film version of Dr. No (1962), though in the film he’d been using a 9mm Beretta 1934 : The Walther PPK throughout the Film Series The particularly observant may notice that the firearm in that scene isn’t actually the Walther PPK, though. While the gun is referred to as a PPK, the actual gun is a Walther PP. Connery’s James Bond with a Suppressed Walther PPK in Thunderball Starting with From Russia with Love (1963), Sean Connery carries an actual Walther PPK in the rest of his appearances as James Bond . When Connery vacated the role before On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), George Lazenby also carried the PPK during his single film interlude in the role. Promotional Image for On Her "Majesty’s Secret Service" of Lazenby with a Walther PPK When Connery came back to play the character again in Diamonds Are Forever (1971), he once again carried the PPK before once again vacating the role, this time to Roger Moore. Sean Connery with a PPK as James Bond in Diamonds Are Forever During Moore’s tenure, the PPK didn’t play quite as central of a role. It appeared only in promotional material for Moonraker (1979), not the actual film. In 1983, it only showed up in the opening credits for Octopussy , with Moore carrying the Walther P5 compact as his primary sidearm instead . Roger Moore’s James Bond with His Walther P5 Compact in Octopussy The Walther PPK was more visible in Sean Connery’s competing James Bond film, Never Say Never Again (the man just couldn’t let the role go, could he?). Sean Connery Carrying the Walther PPK (Again) for Never "Say Never Again" However, Roger Moore carried the Walther PPK in the rest of his appearances as James Bond. Roger Moore Carrying a Walther PPK as James Bond Timothy Dalton also carried the PPK during both of his films as the character. Timothy Dalton’s James Bond with His Walther PPK Pierce Brosnan was the combo breaker. He carried the PPK in Goldeneye (1995), but in Tomorrow Never Dies (1999), the character switches from the Walther PPK to the newly introduced Walther P99. Pierce Brosnan as James Bond with His Walther PPK He continues to carry the P99 through the rest of his films in the franchise. When Daniel Craig took over the role, he carried the Walther P99 in Casino Royal but returned to the PPK afterward. Daniel Craig Shooting the Walther PPK as James Bond But what about the pistols’ appearances outside of the James Bond franchise? Where Else You Can Spot the Walther PPK One of the easiest places to spot the Walther PPK these days is the affection spy film parody, Archer . Like Bond, the titlar Sterling Archer carries the Walther PPK as his preferred sidearm. Sterling Archer Aims His Walther PPK The Walther PPK has also become a staple of the action genre , appearing in films like Die Hard , Bourne Identity , and Zombieland . It is particularly prevalent in media set in and around World War II and the Cold War-like Valkyrie , Inglourious Basterds , and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (both the film and tv show). Hayley Atwell carries one as Agent Carter in Captain America: The First Avenger and a Walther PPK/S in the Agent Carter series. Agent Peggy Carter Aims Her Walther PPK in Captain America: "The First Avenger" The Walther PPK is also a favorite in crime shows like Law & Order and The X-Files . In a fun coincidence, both Franco brothers have carried the Walther PPK on screen, James as Harry Osborn in Spiderman and Dave as Eric Molson in 21 Jump Street . Conclusion So there you have it, a look at the simultaneously weird and awesome history of the iconic Walther PPK, a firearm more famous for its appearance on the silver screen than for its performance as a firearm. Walther PPK 630 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 630 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Guns.Com (See Price) GunBroker.Com (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing That’s not to say that the Walther PPK isn’t an effective weapon. After all, Boothroyd suggested it to Fleming for a reason. The Walther PPK combines reliability, power, and ease of use in a small, easy to conceal package, making it an ideal carry weapon for military personnel, police officers, intelligence agents, and maybe even you. What’s your take on the PPK? Readers' Ratings 4.90/5 (367) Your Rating? And if you want to learn more about our favorite guns & gear…check out Editor’s Picks .  Or if its movie magic you seek…try out Most Realistic Gun Scenes in Movies .

10 Best Bedside Gun Safes 2020

10 Best Bedside Gun Safes 2020

If you are a gun owner, you want to be sure you can quickly and easily access your firearm in an emergency. However, responsible gun owners also need to ensure that their guns are secure and won’t accidentally fall into the wrong hands, whether those of a violent criminal or a curious child . The best way to keep your firearms safe and secure yet readily available is to use a bedside gun safe. There are plenty of options available to the modern gun owner that selecting a bedside gun safe may seem more difficult and confusing than selecting your handgun. Still not sure which one to purchase? Read on, and you will be able to compare the best bedside gun safe models side by side to find the right one for your needs and budget. Top 10 Bedside Gun Safes Comparison Table Picture Name Type of Lock Price Rating (1-5) Picture Name Type of Lock Price Rating (1-5) 1. VAULTEK VT20i Biometric Handgun Safe Bluetooth Smart Pistol Safe with Auto-Open Lid and Rechargeable Battery Biometric and electronic combination $$$$ 4.6 2. Stealth Handgun Hanger Safe Quick Access Electronic Pistol Security Box Electronic combination $$$ 4.4 3. GunVault SV500 - SpeedVault Handgun Safe Electronic combination $$ 4.3 4. Hornady Security Rapid Gun Safe, Black Electronic key fob $ 4.2 5. AmazonBasics Security Safe - 0.5-Cubic Feet Electronic combination $ 4.2 6. BARSKA Top Opening Biometric Fingerprint Safe Biometric $$$ 4.1 7. Gunvault GV1000S Mini Vault Standard Gun Safe Electronic combination $$ 4.1 8. Homak HS10036683 10 x 3.5 x 7.5 Inch Electronic Access Pistol Box Electronic combination $ 3.9 9. Artemis "Biometric Handgun Safe" / Handgun Security Safe - Quick Access to your pistol Biometric $$$ 3.9 10. Gunvault GV2000S Multi Vault Standard Gun Safe Electronic combination $$ 3.8 Choosing a Bedside Gun Safe Many gun owners store their firearms in a large gun safe thinking that it will afford a higher level of security. A bigger gun safe may provide greater fire protection and feature more anti-theft benefits. However, a gun stored in a large gun safe is likely out of reach when you might need it most. A bedside gun safe will allow your firearm to be readily accessible. There are a few things you should take into consideration that will help you determine which safe is the best fit for you and your home. Locks. Today’s bedside gun safes feature several distinct types of locking mechanisms, including: Key Locks. This type of locking mechanism is most common on old-fashioned gun cabinets.  They require a key to unlock and are easier to break into than some other lock designs. Key locks are not a common lock feature for most bedside gun safes because they do not provide quick access. No one wants to be fumbling with keys while in duress and needing access to a weapon. Mechanical Combination Locks. The most common and reliable lock type, mechanical combination locks resemble the lock of your old high school locker. They require a memorized combination and therefore can only be opened by someone who knows the correct sequence of numbers. However, opening them can be difficult and take precious time, especially when under stress. Electronic Combination Locks. Like a mechanical combination lock, these require an access code to open. However, with an electronic lock, there are no dials to manipulate. Instead, you just punch in your combination. They provide quick access, and you can often set the combination. Batteries must be replaced periodically, and if batteries die, it may be become impossible to gain access to the safe’s contents. Biometric Locks. Access is gained to safes with biometric locks with your fingerprint. These locks have become popular for handgun safes because they allow almost instant quick access to secured weapons, but only by select individuals. However, they may not be as reliable as combination locks. Size. The size of your handgun will influence the size gun safe you need. Obviously, if you own a larger handgun, you will require a larger safe. You should also consider where you want to place your gun safe. Is it an appropriate size to slide under the bed? Do you want it to fit inside your nightstand drawer? Will it bother you to have it visible on your bedside table? These are all questions that will help you determine what size gun safe you need. Fire Rating. Most gun safes are lined with fireboard to keep the contents safe from extreme temperatures in the event of a house fire. Safes that are fire resistant are often easier to break in to but will protect your valuables in the event of a fire. Top 3 Best Bedside Gun Safe Reviews 1. VAULTEK VT20i Biometric Handgun Safe If you are looking for rugged anti=theft security, the Vaultek VT20i really delivers. This safe features two-point anti-impact latches and interior mounted hinges for extra protection against break-ins. With its rugged, heavy duty 16-gauge carbon steel construction and durable corrosion-resistant powder coat finish, you can rest assured that this safe will reliably protect its valuable contents for years to come. Smart Safe Technology allows you to use your smartphone to adjust the safe’s interior lighting or unlock from a remote location with a simple swipe of your finger. However, you can also gain quick access to your handgun or other valuables with the easy-to-locate backlit keypad or biometric fingerprint scanner with a storage capacity for up to 20 different user IDs. The style, reliable security features, and easy-access functionality of this durable safe make it hands down the best bedside gun safe on the market today. 2. "Stealth Handgun Hanger" Safe A favorite design of tactical enthusiast, the Stealth Handgun Hanger Safe features a spring-loaded drop-down door for quick access to up to five different handguns and three spare magazines. The safe door pops open so quickly after the correct combination has been entered, that the company installed a speed reducer. This safety feature catches the door for a soft finish, protecting your hard surfaces from jarring or damaging impact. This bedside gun safe features solid steel construction and a recessed door that is practically pry-proof. For an extra level of anti-theft protection, you can bolt down the entire safe. Also included is a free security cable which makes it almost impossible for a thief to sneak off with the safe to open it on his own time. 3. GunVault SV500 – SpeedVault Handgun Safe Multiple mounting options and included hardware, you can conveniently place this easy access gun safe almost anywhere. Featuring rock-solid construction from 18-gauge steel and reliable, high strength locking mechanism, you’ll enjoy peace of mind knowing you’re using some the most reliable security on the market. The soft foam interior keeps your handguns and other valuables safe from scratches and prevents rattling. The foam may need to be customized if you have special hardware or customization on your pistols. Access codes are easy to program, but the safe can be finicky about how quickly you press the combination buttons. It may be difficult to open when you are fumbling from panic or a rush of adrenaline. We recommend doing a few practice runs, because the more you open the safe, the easier the task is to perform even when under duress.

BioLite Headlamp 200 Review for 2020: Hands-On

BioLite Headlamp 200 Review for 2020: Hands-On

Headlamps are like flashlights. And flashlights are like knives. Ergo , headlamps are like knives. Where I’m going with this is to highlight the fact that we are rarely completely satisfied with our current selection. We are always looking around, even if just out of the corner of our eye, for the next better one. Quick Navigation BioLite HeadLamp 200 Review Invisible ‘Till It’s Visible Illumination Education BioLite HeadLamp 200 Review Fortunately, or perhaps not, depending on how you personally handle choices, is the fact that companies today rarely leave a design untouched for long. There’s always something better. Something new. Something more powerful, lighter, stronger. It never ends until you end it personally. To be truly content with an outdoor tool, the very existence of the tool must become invisible in the presence of its task. The object itself must melt into the background completely overshadowed by its capabilities. Invisible ‘Till It’s Visible The BioLite HeadLamp 200 is quickly becoming one of those pieces of gear that disappears when you use it. In fact, that is one of the headlight’s best features. At only 49 grams and a svelte thickness nowhere exceeding 18 millimeters, the BioLite HeadLamp 200 wears a cloak of near-invisibility when not in use. The specifications of the BioLite HeadLamp 200 include light weight, four lighting modes including a dimmable white spotlight, a dimmable red colored flood, and red and white strobes. Powering the BioLite HeadLamp 200 is a USB rechargeable 700mAh lithium ion battery, which for reference, is about a third or forth of the capacity of an iPhone battery depending on phone model. BioLite HeadLamp 200 (Midnight Grey) A headlamp so comfortable, you'll forget you're wearing it. This headlamp delivers excellent fit,... Four light modes: White + Dim , Red + Dim, White Strobe, Red Strobe See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Also Read: Survival Gear Review: The BioLite Prep Kit I’ve been a big fan of headlamps ever since my first one that used four D-cell batteries carried in a red plastic belt-mounted case with a heavy wire leading to a rubber headband containing a large plastic flashlight-like head.  Although that particular light worn on the head (or helmet) was heavy, dim, and had a short runtime, it opened up the world of hands-free lighting. When at full speed, the BioLite HeadLamp 200 will pump out lumens for about three hours. On low that range extends to 40 hours. But unlike battery-fed headlamps, you can leave home or camp with a full charge rather than whatever is left in the little disposable alkaline tanks. Where this BioLite HeadLamp 200 fits into the userspace is with its tiny forehead footprint stressing comfort and bounce-free lighting. By keeping the weight low and the headband wide, you will forget you’re wearing the BioLite HeadLamp 200 regardless of which of the four colors you have on. So confident is BioLite in the comfort of this headlamp that they have a 30-day HolyFit Guarantee . The microUSB charging port on the BioLite HeadLamp 200 is at the nine-o’clock position (facing forward). A green light breathes in and out, pulsing gently as the battery drinks in the electrons. The onboard lithium cell takes about two and a half hours to go from bone dry to stuffed to the gills. Plus, the BioLite HeadLamp 200 gives a brief blip of green light when powering down that indicates good or low battery life. As a comparison, my other superlight headlamp is the Streamlight Bandit LED headlamp. However, the Bandit has never seemed to be much of a performer outside of it’s tiny footprint and low weight. The light it casts is bland and shallow, and the on-off button is troublesome with bare fingers and near-impossible with gloves. Until new interfaces are discovered, the finger-push button will remain the industry standard as long as the finger is also the standard. That fact limits how small or sensitive a headlamp interface can be. Black Diamond does have some touch control headlamps, but only minor systems like brightness. The main I/O is still a rubber-covered index-finger-ready switch. The Streamlight Bandit weighs about a tenth of an ounce less than the BioLite, but throws much less light than the 20 lumen difference between them in the specs. I find the Bandit to be less comfortable with its narrow band, and the light from the Bandit has much less reach. Great for reading in a sleeping bag, but not for forest travel any faster than a walk. The BioLite HeadLamp 200 provides enough of the right kind of light for an easy jog through the woods, and a full on run across the flats. Plus the wider “Smart Fabric” headband is vastly more effective at holding the light in place. However, it did seem to loosen over time a little under certain conditions. Illumination Education The Bandit actually contains 10 individual LEDs in a row across the front of the headlamp window. Rated at 180 lumens, I suspect that it means that each of those individual LEDs is about 18 lumens thus totaling 180. You can do that. But the human eye does not agree. Two 50 lumen flashlights do not appear as bright as a single LED 100 lumen one. So lumens are only one kind of reference point. Imagine fighting a fire with a garden hose that sprays water at 10 gallons per minute. Now get nine more hoses giving you 100 gallons per minute output. Compare that to a single hose blasting out 100 gallons per minute. While not quite the same as our eye’s logarithmic interpretation of brightness, you can see that there is more behind the lumen number than just quantity. The initial single-point brute force lumen number appears greater than the sum of multiple lesser lumens with an equivalent total. BioLite HeadLamp 200 (Midnight Grey) A headlamp so comfortable, you'll forget you're wearing it. This headlamp delivers excellent fit,... Four light modes: White + Dim , Red + Dim, White Strobe, Red Strobe See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:58 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Also Read: "Survival Gear Review" : Fenix HMR50 Headlamp Both the BioLite HeadLamp 200 and the Bandit tilt downward. It seems that around 60 degrees down (a little more than half way) is about right for most close tasks and is the limit of the BioLite HeadLamp 200. Any more and the glare off your nose will be a problem. But that doesn’t stop the Bandit. Since it uses a dual clip mechanism to allow it to attach (and shortly thereafter fall off of) a baseball cap brim, it can fold 180 degrees allowing you to point the light directly into your own eyes. But the big difference is the operation of the on/off switch. Both the BioLite HeadLamp 200 and the Bandit have the switch in the center of the light, but while the BioLite HeadLamp 200 button points up, the Bandits is on a slope pointing about 45 degrees forward. That minor point makes the Bandit much harder to ignite especially with gloves. And again with both, the switch rotates with the light so it must be indexed with the lens rather than the headband. This is a common situation with headlamps, but in most other cases there is considerably more mass and volume to push back when operating the switch. While a little practice is helpful, operating the BioLite HeadLamp 200 requires attention to the fact that the switch is also the handle to pull the light downward. Beyond lumens feature. The BioLite HeadLamp 200 has two outputs; a minimum of 5 lumens and a max of 200. Burntime is about 40 hours on low and three hours on maximum output. However, while maximum output begins at 200 lumens, the number drops over time. Essentially, any maximum output runtime just means that the lamp is giving its all until death even if that means an hour of very low output. For fans of a red light, there is both a red flood (solid on) and a red strobe option. Red light is the longest wavelength our eyes can see. Anything longer is infrared or beyond (microwaves, radio waves, etc.). By using a red light source, the retina stays within its scotopic (rods) black and white vision mode. A white light would cause the retina to transition into the photopic (cones) color vision mode which is much less sensitive in low light. So even though you are using an artificial light source, the red wavelengths are as close to dark as possible meaning when you turn off the red light, you still have dark-adapted vision. There is little to no time delay between seeing under the red light, and with ambient moon light. The BioLite HeadLamp 200 weighs about 1.7 ounces. And that gave me an idea. What if I used the sub-2 ounce rule to build a quick survival kit . Of the four big ones of knife-water-fire-light, I found that my Benchmade Bugout knife weighs in at 1.8oz, my LifeStraw at 1.6oz, and my Bic Lighter inside a waterproof Exotac FireSLEEVE was a scant 1.5oz. All four combined weigh in at under seven ounces. Not a bad footprint for a grab-and-go set of kit. BioLite retails the BioLite HeadLamp 200 for less than $100, which puts it in about the middle of the cost spectrum for general purpose headlamps. You can spend half that or twice that and still get what you pay for. But when cutting weight and size is important, the price dynamic becomes nuanced since both less is less and less is more are at play. And with the BioLite HeadLamp 200, less is more. BioLite HeadLamp 200 (Midnight Grey) A headlamp so comfortable, you'll forget you're wearing it. This headlamp delivers excellent fit,... Four light modes: White + Dim , Red + Dim, White Strobe, Red Strobe See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Other interesting articles: Fenix HM50R Headlamp Review: Hands-On Review BioLite CampStove 2 Review: Hands-On Personal Experiences Leatherman Raptor Shears Review for 2020: Hands-On for Survi Benchmade Adamas Knife Review for 2020: Survival Gear Hands-On

Grizzly Targets: The #1 Story You Missed

Grizzly Targets is one of the up and coming companies that you might have over looked at SHOT Show 2017 if you were there. If you missed out on them have no fear, we are working with this Florida based company to bring you the latest and greatest in AR500 grade steel targets. The Tampa, Florida based company offers a huge array of targets in several different configurations. We reached out to Grizzly Targets after we received a press release from them and we liked what we saw, we like it so much that we are in the beginning stages of seeing if we can’t work up a sort of show and tell session about them. The second part of that whole process is that we are thinking that one lucky fan might enjoy winning some form of Grizzly Steel Targets for their own use. Here is a little more about the company straight from them. “Hard work.  The drive to succeed.  Just win.  A second chance… That all sounds great, but how often to do we actually get to see a real life example unfolding before our eyes? Welcome to Grizzly Targets. Faced with a company that was about to shut down, 36 year old entrepreneur and marketer Jeremy Griffin took matters into his own hands and prevented the company from becoming just another statistic. Grizzly is now in the process of creating the model for small manufacturing in modern day America.  From profit sharing to technology, along with good old fashioned hard work and customer service, Grizzly Targets is not only back but making a case for comeback story of the year. Jeremy and shop manager Mark Askren (still with the company, featured on homepage of website) helped launch Grizzly from Mark’s garage back in 2013, and are now steering the company into 2017 and beyond.  Changes include profit sharing and share options for employees, a re-commitment to both customer service and strategic partnerships, while continuing to create and deliver some of the industry’s longest lasting AR500 steel targets on the market. How to follow along? This is the perfect opportunity to create an online series that not only allows viewers to follow along, but to learn all the ins and outs to being a startup. See the headaches, and see what works. And that is exactly what Jeremy and Mark are in the process of doing.  Sweat-N-Steel is set to begin airing late April with the first episode dropping in early May, and has already been given the green light by several industry media channels for distribution.” What that means in a nutshell is that big things are on the horizon for the guys at "Grizzly Steel Targets" and if you are intrigued by what you’ve read and want to know more about Grizzly Steel Targets we encourage you to click the link below or send them an email. We are always on the look out for great products made here in the United States. If those products save you money and provide long lasting durability, then it’s a double bonus for our readers. Take a look around the web site provided below and let us know what you think and most importantly which one of the targets would you like to see added to the upcoming 10,000 like give away. Remember this is a fluid situation that is still evolving, so anything can happen around here, sometimes without our knowing it. www.grizzlytargets.com Image:grizzlytargets.com Feature Image:grizzlytargets.com

Best AR-15 Magazines of 2020 Top Picks Reviewed

Are you looking for the best AR-15 magazine? If so, you’ve come to the right place. Having the right kind of magazine for your rifle is key for any application. You may settle for 30 rounds in one magazine or you can go for fewer (or even more). Regardless of how many you need, there’s a reliable magazine that will hold all kinds of rounds you’ll be dying to fire off at the range or in a hunting situation. To get you started on the search, we’ve handpicked eight of the best AR-15 magazines currently on the market. Before we get to our list, we’ll be discussing why you can never have too many magazines. And we’ll also discuss what sets a great AR-15 magazine apart from one that is considered crappy and low-quality. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for AR15 Magazines OUR TOP PICK: Magpul - AR-15 30Rd PMAG Gen M3 Magazine 223/5.56 Magpul - AR-15 D60 60-RD Drum W/ 2 30-RD PMAGS Magpul - AR-15 10RD PMAG Gen M3 Magazine223/5.56 Brownells - AR-15 25-rd Straight Body Steel Magazine D&H 5.56 30rd Aluminum Magazine Comparison of the Best AR-15 Magazines IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Magpul - AR-15 30Rd PMAG Gen M3 Magazine 223/5.56 30 round capacity. Reliable feed lip for smooth shooting. Body made from high-quality polymer. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Magpul - AR-15 D60 60-RD Drum W/ 2 30-RD PMAGS Best drum magazine for AR-15 rifles. Self-lubricated for increased reliability. 60-round capacity (plus two regular 30-round capacity PMAGs). "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Magpul - AR-15 10RD PMAG Gen M3 Magazine223/5.56 Reliable feeding and shooting. Can handle .223 or 5.56 NATO rounds. Best 10-Round Magazine for an AR-15 rifle. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Brownells - AR-15 25-rd Straight "Body Steel Magazine" Best fit for .223 caliber rounds. Best 25-round magazine for an AR-15 rifle. Made from high-quality steel for superior durability. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews D&H 5.56 "30rd Aluminum Magazine" 30-Round Capacity. Foliage green or anti-tilt yellow follower. Made from high-quality aluminum and Teflon coating. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews 200 Rounds Federal 5.56mm NATO 55GR FMJ-BT Ammunition & Ten Magpul PMAG 30 5.56x45mm Magazines Best AR-15 magazine for the money. Made from crush-proof, impact resistant polymer. Magazines are 30-round capacity. But contain 20 rounds. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews D&H 7.62x39mm 10 Rd AR-15 Magazine Holds up to 10 rounds. Made from high-quality aluminum. The best 7.62x39mm magazine for the AR-15 rifle. View Latest Price Read Customer Reviews SureFire High-Capacity Magazine, 60 Rd Holds up to 60 rounds. Made from high-quality aluminum. Fits 5.56 NATO and .223 caliber rounds. View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Why You Can Never Have Too Many Magazines In our point of view, it’s not always a bad thing to have a lot of magazines. In fact, there is no such thing as having too many. There are a few good reasons why you should have extras handy. Here are a few advantages you might enjoy if you keep additional magazines on hand: When One Jams, You Have Extras Things happen, especially when you’re a seasoned AR-15 user. There will come a time when your magazine won’t be as reliable as you think. It can be due to a wide variety of reasons. It might jam easily and won’t allow you to fire a single shot. At this point, you’ll need to release it quickly and replace it with another. You’ll have a fresh magazine that’s fully loaded and ready to go just in case the original decided to jam and freeze up on you. Just press the mag release button and quickly reload. Faster Reloading This might come in handy in a handful of applications. If you have additional magazines, have them all ready to go for quick reloading. It’s a lot better than having to rely on just one option. Plus, it saves you a lot of time and headaches you would otherwise suffer from reloading manually. Once it is empty and time is not on your side, you can simply drop it and add in a new one in a matter of seconds. Source Different Capacities to Test Out What if you feel like 30-rounds just isn’t enough? What if you want to carry fewer rounds? While it might sound a little crazy, you should try and use magazines with different capacities. For example, you should have a few with have capacities of 20 rounds. Or, if you want more, consider one with a capacity of 40. Either way, find an increment that’s slightly more or less than your magazine’s original capacity. What Makes a Great AR-15 Magazine The question that often gets asked is: what distinguishes a great AR-15 magazine from one that is considered ineffective and crappy in quality? There are a few distinctions that make most of these stand head and shoulders above the rest currently flooding the market. Whether you’re a first-time buyer or someone looking for an upgrade, you should follow this list to help you along with your search to find a better magazine. Here’s what you need to look out for: How Many Rounds Do You Need? The standard AR-15 magazine has 30 rounds. However, you might be able to get one with lower or even higher capacities. Either way, it all comes down to your personal needs and preferences. Another thing to note is that it can also depend on your intent and purpose. Sometimes, having more than 30 rounds would be ideal for one application while it can be overkill for another. Material Of course, the material matters when looking for a great magazine. There will come a time when you’ll need to release a magazine due to it being empty or perhaps jamming. You’ll want it to be made from an impact-resistant material. In other words, you’ll be faced with situations where magazines fall freely to the ground, onto a hard surface like concrete or pavement. One of the best materials to take on these elements is polymer. So, if you want one that won’t break easily, this material will be your best bet. Other materials may include aluminum, which is available in some types that have been battle-tested to take on hard surface impact. Source Price As is the case with all budget shoppers, there is a good chance you may consider price as one of your deciding factors. While looking for an affordable price tag on your next magazine, it’s important to find some secondary qualities that will be a driving force toward your decision. For example, take note of the material it’s made from. If it’s made of high-quality material, there’s a good chance it will last you a long time. Yes, affordable, high-quality magazines do exist. The only difference is, the price will be on a higher but affordable scale compared to others that are actually cheaply made. Quick Take - The Best AR-15 Magazines These are our recommendations for the best AR-15 magazines: ​Magpul - AR-15 30-Round PMAG Gen M3 Magazine 223/5.56 ​Magpul - AR-15 D60 60-Round Drum W/ 2 30-RD PMAGS ​Magpul - AR-15 10RD PMAG Gen M3 Magazine223/5.56 Review of the Best AR-15 Magazines The following is a list of eight of the best AR-15 magazines currently on the market. As you go through each one, you’ll want to pay special attention to what its particular features and functions are. These were chosen as the best in a certain subcategory (most of them are best in a certain round count). Regardless of what you’re looking for, give each of these magazines a chance by looking carefully at each of them. You might find one which may be much better than the one you were previously considering. With that said, let’s begin with the “best overall” choice: Best Overall: Magpul - AR-15 30-Round PMAG Gen M3 Magazine 223/5.56 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Fits Nice and Tight in Most Magwells Tough as Nails, Will Likely Last You a Lifetime No Jamming Issues After Hundreds or Thousands of Rounds Cons Might Be a Little Difficult to Fit or Remove From Some Magwells First up, we’ll be taking a look at the Magpul AR-15 30-Round PMAG Gen M3 Magazine. If you’re looking for a product that works with either .223 caliber or 5.56 NATO rounds, this might be exactly what you’re looking for. The body is made from high-quality polymer, making it resistant to all kinds of hard surface impacts. It’s also crush-proof, so you’ll be dealing with a tough customer of a magazine. It’s a tool-less assembly that you can easily take apart in case you want to clean it from the inside out. There is nothing that will make a magazine last longer than taking good care of it. This has a feed lip designed to give you a reliable feed each time. So it won’t easily jam on you whenever you have a shooting session at the range or when you need to get a shot off quickly while bearing down on a big game target. Either way, it’s going to be reliable when you need it most. This holds the standard 30 rounds that you can use for almost any application. And it’s probably one of the best PMAG-style magazines currently on the market. If you fancy yourself to be a fan of PMAGs, the Magpul could just be exactly what you’re looking for. Bottom Line This is tough as nails and much better than standard 30-round options. It takes the best overall spot because of its ability to take on 5.56 and .223 rounds. Magpul has long been considered one of the best brands when it comes to accessories. If you’re willing to give this brand a try, start by getting this magazine for your AR-15 rifle. Best Drum Magazine: Magpul - AR-15 D60 60-Round Drum W/ 2 30-RD PMAGS CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Super Durable Magazines Extra P-Mags Are a Great Added Convenience Functions are Flawless. No Jamming After Numerous Rounds Cons None Now, we’ll be taking a look at the best drum magazine for an AR-15 rifle. Once again, the Magpul brand will be the focus. The drum magazine itself can hold up to 60 rounds. Aside from that, you get two standard magazines, each with a 30 round capacity. So with all that, you get a total of 120 rounds in one complete package. Pretty nice to have some extras handy along with the one you’re initially buying, right? The drum magazine is best used for those who are more apt to shoot their AR-15 rifle from the prone position. Plus, it’s the product you’ll want if planning on spending an extended day at the range. If you’re looking for something that’s best-designed for those kinds of days, this drum magazine will be your best friend. Each piece is made from high-quality polymer that is impact-proof and crush-proof. So these will be tougher than anything else you might find on the market. Best of all, they are resistant to all kinds of corrosion. For added reliability, all each is self-lubricated, so you won’t have to deal with a single jam, even when you’re going through hundreds or even thousands of rounds. The design itself is great if you want to make loading much easier. The anti-tilt followers included in each magazine will allow for even more ease in terms of the loading/reloading process. If you’re looking for simplicity in reloading, these Magpul PMAGs (and the drum magazine) will be your best possible options. Bottom Line Don’t you love getting package deals? We do. But if you’re looking for something that will give you as many rounds as a drum magazine can give you, this Magpul product will be your best bet. Especially if you want something that will be your go-to magazine for extended shooting sessions at the range. Plus, the addition of two PMAGs is always good to have, especially when you want spare magazines handy in case one of them goes south. Best 10-Round Magazine: Magpul - AR-15 10RD PMAG Gen M3 Magazine223/5.56 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Great for Bench Shooters Super Durable Construction Best Fit for Hunting Applications Cons Some Users Have Complained About Feeding Issues Follower May Need Some Tweaking Before Initial Use Yet another Magpul brand magazine makes our list as we take a look at the best ten-round product currently available. This PMAG can contain .223 or 5.56 NATO rounds. Either way, you’ll be able to use a product that won’t give you any grief with either caliber round. This is an ultra-compact magazine that will be excellent for hunting or self-defense. Like all other Magpul magazines out there, they are made from high-quality polymer designed to take on all kinds of damage. If you’re dropping this freely on a hard surface, it won’t shatter. If that’s what you look for in a magazine, then at this point you know that Magpul is a good brand to go with. Even for a ten-round option like this, you still get the same reliability and smooth shooting that you can get from just about any other out there. The curved design makes loading and reloading easier. If you’re tired of struggling with the loading or reloading process, you’ll love this Magpul magazine. Then again, since you’re dealing with a ten-round capacity, the reloading will be a little quicker than reloading a 30-rounder. Not bad at all, we think. Bottom Line If you don’t fancy yourself a fan of the 30-round or higher magazines, then maybe ten rounds will be your cup of coffee. In that case, this Magpul will probably be your best choice. If you’re a hunter, odds are you don’t really need so many rounds to land a big game target. Most hunters will agree that ten rounds will be sufficient. If you plan on using your AR-15 rifle for hunting applications, you’ll need a reliable magazine just for that purpose. So why not get the Magpul PMAG ten-round magazine and put it to the test the next time you’re out in the field? Best 25-Round Magazine: ​ Brownells - AR-15 25-RD Straight Body Steel Magazine CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Tough as Nails, thanks to the Steel Excellent for All Kinds of Applications Super Reliable Compared to the 25-Round Mags of Ages Past Cons None So, ten rounds might be too few for you. But 30 rounds might be too much, as well. Why not go with a happy medium, like 25 rounds? If you’re looking for that many rounds, the Brownells AR-15 25-round, straight-body steel magazine could be exactly what you’re looking for. This product works exclusively with .223 caliber rounds. So if you happen to have some of those rounds laying around, this product will accommodate them. This is made of high-quality steel. It’s the closest you can get to a classic AR-15-style magazine. If you’re a sucker for a classic design, this Brownells brand could just be what you’re looking for. It’s been said that due to reliability issues, 25-round magazines are lesser in existence. But now, they are making a comeback, only this time with more reliable shooting than ever before. So if you want to go back to the golden age of AR-15 shooting with the reliability that apparently was a miss beforehand, this is your opportunity to grab this for your own use. Bottom Line If you’re a long time AR-15 shooter, you’re probably happy to see these 25-round magazines make a comeback. For something that might be considered a “blast from the past”, this product from Brownells might just fit the bill. It doesn’t matter what kind of application you’re using it for, if you really want to know what it was like firing an AR-15 rifle back in the day, you’ll have the magazine for it. ​5. D&H 5.56 30-Round Aluminum Magazine CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros "Super Durable Construction" No Issues After a Thousand Rounds Lightweight and Doesn’t Add Any Unnecessary Weight to Your Rifle Cons Some Issues With the Loading/Reloading Edges are a Little Sharp and May Need to Be Filed Down May Not Lock Into Rifles That Fire .300 Blackout Rounds Next on the agenda, we’ll be taking a look at the D&H 5.56 30- "Round Aluminum Magazine" . One thing we notice right off the bat is that it’s made from high-quality, 6061-T6 aluminum. This will be a durable product that won’t easily bust apart if you decide to drop it freely and it hits a hard surface. Before any of these hit the market, they are heat-treated and battle-tested to ensure they are fully functional and free from any reliability issues. Once they pass with flying colors, they're set and ready to rock, just for you. This contains 30 rounds, which is the standard count for most AR-15 magazines. The follower is available in either a foliage green or anti-tilt yellow. Either way, it’s bright enough to give you an easier load each time. This has a Teflon coating on the inside and out. So in plain English, this is basically the toughest, most durable product you can possibly find on the market. If you’re looking for a product that’s the best of the best and will stand the test of time, the D&H 5.56 aluminum magazine might be the product you’ll want to have on hand. These are so good, you may want to buy extras just to be on the safe side. Bottom Line If you’re looking for a great AR-15 magazine, you will be quite happy with the D&H brand product. They are tough all over and do pretty good for your standard AR-15 magazines. Whether you’re using it for target practice or hunting, you have a reliable magazine that will hold your usual 30 rounds. If you don’t want to settle for anything more or less than that, this might be the magazine you choose as your go-to. ​ 6. "200 Rounds Federal" 5.56mm NATO 55GR FMJ-BT Ammunition & Ten Magpul PMAG 30 5.56x45mm Magazines CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Very Reliable Shooting With No Jams No Issues After 100 Rounds Fired Magazines Are Virtually Indestructible Cons "Some Users Have" Had Ammo Retention Issues Now, we’ll be taking a look at our choice for those who want to buy a magazine, but have a certain budget set in place. The honor for “best for the money” is given to the Magpul PMAG 30 5.56x45mm magazine. Actually, you’ll be getting quite a package deal out of this. You’ll get ten magazines, each filled with 20 rounds of Federal 5.56mm NATO 55 Grain FMJ bullets. If that isn’t impressive for those on a budget, then we can’t tell you what is. These are Magpul brand magazines made from high-quality, impact-resistant, and crush-proof polymer. Here’s where these take the cake: they are self-lubricated. This will make your shooting smooth and reliable. So it won’t jam or get stuck in the magazine itself. Plus, you won’t have to lubricate them manually (which might be a major pain for some shooters). The design is slightly curved, making the loading process a little easier for those who find it a challenge with other magazines. If you’re looking for a design that promotes better ergonomics, this product might be right up your alley. Of course, let’s not forget that this product is the best for your money, especially for a budget shopper like yourself (assuming you are one). Bottom Line For someone on a budget, you can know for sure that you’re getting a dang good deal out of this. Think about it: ten magazines with rounds loaded and ready to go. Plus, you have some spare mags handy that are compatible with 5.56 rounds. So it’s a win-win for you, especially when you want spare mags on hand should one of them jam on you in the future. All of these are reliable and designed to last you a long time. In fact, we won’t be surprised if you have all ten still functioning after a few years. If you’re looking for a product that will last you for as long as possible, the Magpul PMAG magazines are your best possible option. Why get one, when you can get ten? 7. D&H 7.62x39mm 10-Rd AR-15 Magazine CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Super Strong Quality Fits Great on Most AR-15 Rifles Flawless Performance, No Jamming After 100 Rounds Cons Might Not Be Able to Fit the Last Two Rounds as it Might Be Difficult For another AR-15 magazine on our list, we’ll be taking a look at the D&H 7.62x39mm 10-Round AR-15 Magazine. This product will contain up to ten rounds of 7.62x39mm caliber bullets. If your rifle is chambered to handle these types of ammo , you’ll probably want this to be your go-to in almost any application. At ten rounds, this will definitely be your product of choice if you’re more of an AR-15 hunter. The body is made from high-quality aluminum designed to be durable from the inside, out. So in essence, it will last you a long period of time, as long as you take good care of it. If you’re no fan of magazines with more than ten rounds, you can probably settle for the D&H AR-15 magazine for 7.62x39mm caliber rounds. Bottom Line It’s not uncommon for people to fire off 7.62x39mm rounds. But we think it’s only fair to include a magazine that would best fit these kinds of shooters. The D&H is reliable and will deliver superb performance for those who want smooth, accurate shooting in many applications, including hunting. Since it’s durable, don’t be surprised if it ends up lasting you a year or beyond. Best 60-Round Magazine: SureFire High-Capacity Magazine, 60-Rd CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Excellent for Those Who Want More Firing Capacity Great to Use for Extended Target Shooting Sessions Lightweight, Doesn’t Add on "Any Unnecessary Weight" Cons Some Have Had Issues Trying to Fit This in Some AR-15 Lower Receivers May Not Be Legal to Own in Some Jurisdictions. Please Consult Your Local and State Gun Laws Before Purchasing Finally, we’ll be taking a look at the best 60-round magazine on the market. For our choice, we’ll be taking a look at the SureFire High-Capacity Magazine with the ability to hold 60 rounds at a time. What’s more interesting is that this is not a drum-like design. So if you’re not a fan of drum magazines but still want the same amount of rounds, this will be the solution. This is made from high-quality aluminum. It is designed to last you a long time and won’t easily break if they somehow hit a hard surface. You’ll want to have this puppy handy, if you’re planning on making it a long day at the range. You can have a lot of rounds for a shooting session with magazines like this. Other than that, they are reliable and will always provide you with smooth feeding and shooting. Don’t be shocked if you don’t encounter a single jam after hundreds or thousands of rounds. Bottom Line Maybe 60 rounds are more your speed? If so, then you’ll want a high-capacity magazine like this. These will take your standard AR-15 caliber rounds and be perfect for target shooting or even competitive target shooting. You can have a lot of rounds just for the sake of these applications. However, it might be a little bit of overkill if you’re considering using this many rounds for hunting or self-defense. Conclusion The best AR-15 magazine is out there. But it comes down to some of your personal preferences and needs. What are your intents and purposes? How many rounds do you actually need? No matter how you answer these questions, there is a magazine with your name on it. Consider the eight AR-15 products above and make your decision. People Also Ask As a way to help you find the best AR-15 magazine, we’ve taken the liberty of compiling a few frequently asked questions that will pertain to your search. Use these questions and answers as a guide so you can make the decision process a lot easier. Here are the following questions: How to Load an AR-15 magazine? To load an AR-15 magazine manually, you’ll need to press the bullet downward. Use the follower to load a magazine. Line the bullet up with the imprint seen on the follower. Press down and keep loading until you reach the capacity limit. "How Many Rounds" Does an AR-15 Magazine Hold? A standard AR-15 magazine will hold up to 30 rounds. However, there are other products that have a lower capacity like ten rounds and higher capacities up to 60 rounds. What Calibers Fit in an AR-15 Magazine? The most popular rounds that will fit in AR-15 rifles are 5.56 NATO and .223 calibers. Other calibers include .308 and .300 AAC Blackout. How Much Does a Full AR-15 Magazine Weigh? Since the average unloaded AR-15 rifle weighs roughly six pounds, a fully loaded, 30-round magazine can bump up the weight to seven pounds. Therefore, magazines roughly weigh one-pound once fully loaded.

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s History is full of odd items and events that make us modern humans marvel at their sheer weirdness…and firearms history is no exception. You’ve probably heard of your fair share of weird, but well-known firearms, from pocket knife pistols to guns built into walking canes to rifles with curved barrels intended to allow the user to shoot around corners. Henry VIII’s Three Barreled Mace Pistol Today, however, we’re going to talk about some firearms you probably haven’t heard about.